Buy A Home After School Starts

3 Reasons To Buy A Home After School Starts

Should you wait until school starts to buy a new house?!

It’s been said time and time again that the best time to put a house up for sale is around early spring. While that may be true for sellers, it’s the exact opposite for buyers! Here are some quick points to consider when looking to buy this fall.

1. Time On The Market

One issue that works against sellers (but favors buyers) is the length of time a home has been on the market. The longer a home sits unsold, the more bargaining power a buyer has, Smoke says. Also, inventory tends to increase from summer to fall because homes aren’t selling as quickly. Active listings on Realtor.com remained for a median of 65 days in May and June. But in August, that number was projected to increase to 72 days. That shouldn’t dissuade potential buyers from considering a home, Smoke says.

“If the home and location seem to fit, don’t cross it off your list just because of the time of the year or the time on market,” Smoke says. “There will always be sellers who need to put their home on the market.” Also, the services related to buying — moving, buying furniture, signing up for cable — tend to be discounted toward the end of the year and during winter, Smoke notes.

2. Less Competition

Once school starts, there are fewer buyers to compete with on your offer. Most families prefer to move before their darlings head back to school. Also, cooler weather drives down demand. In fact, from now until February, buyers have more leverage than during the rest of the year because there’s still a large amount of inventory relative to the time of year, says Jonathan Smoke, Realtor.com’s chief economist.

In 2015, sales of existing single-family homes nationwide declined 3.7%, from 4.86 million in July to 4.68 million in October, according to the National Association of Realtors. Granted, if you live in a market with a tight inventory and brisk sales (such as San Francisco and Seattle), you still might face stiff competition. But in markets like Indianapolis or St. Louis, you’ll see a lot less gladiator-style jostling and more chances to negotiate with sellers when you buy a home.

3. Prices Match Market Value

If homes listed during the busy summer months didn’t sell, chances are that they were overpriced. That means homebuyers will see prices fall more in line with market value, says Mark Goldman, a real estate instructor at San Diego State University and a loan officer with C2 Financial Corp.

For example, in 2015, the U.S. median sale price dropped 5.5%, from $233,400 in July to $220,600 in October, according to NAR.

Working with a real estate agent who can assess asking prices can help you avoid overpaying, Goldman says. If you want to buy a home that’s priced higher than what your agent estimates to be appropriate, submit an offer that’s in line with market value and with comparable sales data attached to back it up.

If you are looking to buy a house this late summer/fall, please reach out to one of our agents or contact us by calling or the website. We look forward to helping you find your new home!

Do you know how much your home is worth? Read up here!